it’s finally happening, 1.5 months after i tweaked my back i am starting to feel like i’m getting my core (awful word) sorted again.  i feel not just like i have a flat stomach but that there’s a thick wall of muscle underneath that makes a dull knocking sound when i rap on my sides.  hallelujah.

there’s a peculiarity to dating in las vegas that goes something like…meet a girl on match or similar, chit-chat and finally meet for a drink or coffee.  as you exchange that initial greeting, usually a hug, you get what i call the “caliper check”, that is she’ll unabashedly grab your muffin-top area with her thumb and forefinger and give a little pinch.  i’m not kidding!  if that doesn’t happen it will be your upper arm at some point during the date. it’s even happened to me just walking through a bar.  vegas.

Calipers

WOD 1.30.13

warmup, front squats 95, then 115 (3 second pause at bottom of motion for the first set only) 6 sets of 6.  Shoulder presses at 95, 5 x 7.

I haven’t begun the german volume training i said i would earlier because i’m still concerned for my back.  🙁

strongman lifting a hummer

 

In the Gym

Link

because i’m tired of having a sore back and because i feel i need a change-up, i’m going to bang out a couple of weeks of hypertrophy using the german volume training technique as defined by charles poliquin. see below

Article:
Supersets and tri-sets allow you to perform a lot of work in a short period of time. The rest-pause method allows you to use heavier weights so you can recruit the higher-threshold muscle fibers, and eccentric training enables you to overcome strength plateaus. The bottom line is that almost any training method will work (provided you do it with intensity!), at least for the few weeks it takes for your body to adapt to it. There is, however, one training system that stands above all the rest. It’s brutally hard, but I’ve found it to be a very effective way to pack on muscle fast!
Canadian weightlifting coach Pierre Roy used GVT when he trained Jacques Demers, a silver medalist in the 1984 Olympic Games. Here Coach Roy is shown with his two 2010 Junior World Team members, Kristel Ngariem and Paul Dumais.

Canadian weightlifting coach Pierre Roy used GVT when he trained Jacques Demers, a silver medalist in the 1984 Olympic Games. Here Coach Roy is shown with his two 2010 Junior World Team members, Kristel Ngariem and Paul Dumais.

In strength-coaching circles, this method is often called the “10 sets method.” Because it has its roots in German-speaking countries, I like to call it German Volume Training. To the best of my knowledge, this training system originated in Germany in the mid-’70s and was popularized by Rolf Feser, who was then the National Coach of Weightlifting. A similar protocol was promoted by Vince Gironda in the US, but regardless of who actually invented it, it works.

In Germany, the 10 sets method was used in the off-season to help weightlifters gain lean body mass. It was so efficient that lifters routinely moved up a full weight class within 12 weeks. German Volume Training was the base program of Canadian weightlifter Jacques Demers, a silver medalist in the Los Angeles Olympic Games who was coached by Pierre Roy. Jacques was known in weightlifting circles for his massive thighs, and he gives credit to the German method for achieving such a spectacular level of hypertrophy. The same method was also used by Bev Francis in her early days of bodybuilding to pack on muscle…
http://www.charlespoliquin.com/ArticlesMultimedia/Articles/Article/441/German_Volume_Training.aspx