In my Belly

traditional french mussels in wine and garlic recipe

traditional mussels the french way, wine and garlic

traditional mussels the french way, wine and garlic

mise en place:(get yer crap ready)
finely chop 1 lobe of a large shallot
finely chop 2 garlic cloves
run a knife through a small handful of parsley, or cilantro, or thyme, or…

mise en place

mise en place

wash and de-beard 1 pound of mussels (i bought the only ones i could find at partial foods)
dispose of any open ones (dead).

rinse and de-beard mussels

rinse and de-beard mussels

have 1 cup of a dry white wine (little to no oak) measured out, i used a california savvy-b, this leaves plenty for the cook
have some crusty bread for dipping in the broth, i broiled mine with butter

method:
sautee shallot in 2 tbsp butter until soft, then add garlic and sautee for a couple more minutes
add in the wine and bring to a boil
DSCN0812
add the mussels in a single layer, cover
cook for 3-8 minutes, most of the mussels will open within 3 minutes, some may take longer
dispose of any unopened mussels as they are/were dead
DSCN0813
toss in herbs if any (parsley)
mange

In my Belly

chicken soup recipe

chop and saute 1 med yellow onion in olive oil
sauteeing onion

 

chop and sautee 4 carrots, 3 celery stalks, and 12 asparagi in oil

mirepoix ++

mirepoix ++

remove the meat from a leftover chicken, and refrigerated

bone bag?

bone bag?

put the carcass in a !?bag, me mum gave me this, apparently they are made for this purpose

into the crock-pot; the mirepoix (sauteed veg trio os onion, celery, carrot) and asparagus

1 quart of chicken broth, 2 quarts of water, s&p to taste.

cooked on high setting until boiling, added 2/3 cup of wild rice, turned to low and left overnight

croc-pot full of chicken soup

croc-pot full of chicken soup

Know this…

very interesting, and goes along with my tail-to-snout vision of cooking.  look at the last few paragraphs about carnitine.  yikes!

The Zombie Diet

by TC – 4/26/2013
The Zombie Diet

The clues have been there all along. It’s not like they were staring us in the face, but they surely didn’t need any CSI-level sleuthing to unearth them.

All you had to do was look here and there and connect the nutritional dots, and that’s what science writer Mary Roach did in her book, Gulp.

Her first clue was a rather bizarre one. It popped up in a relatively obscure report done in 1973 by the Center for Science and Public Interest (CSPI). The CSPI had taken 36 protein-rich foods and ranked them according to nutritional value.

There, ranked above such foods as shrimp, ham, sirloin steak, peanut butter, fried chicken, and pure-beef hotdogs, was Alpo.

Yeah, that Alpo – the dog food.

The CSPI put it on their list because they’d heard widespread reports that poor people ate a lot of Alpo because of it’s low-cost, at least when you compared its cost to some of the other protein foods on the list.

But Alpo, a nutritional super star for humans? What in the dog slurping, meaty-fresh canine world of cuisine was going on?

All you had to do was look at the top of the nutritional list to get the answer. There, ranked number one by a hefty margin was beef liver, followed closely by chicken liver.

Clearly, liver had something going on, nutritionally, and if you read the list of ingredients on Alpo, you see that it contains beef liver, hence the dog food’s relatively high standing on the CSPI’s list.

But let’s metaphorically stick liver in our pocket for the moment. (I say “metaphorically” so that any sick Alex Portnoy copycats aren’t tempted to do as he did, which was to purchase a slab of liver at the butcher shop, smuggle it behind a billboard, and bugger it before heading to his bar mitzvah lesson.)

see more…

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/the_zombie_diet

Know this…

Michael Pollan Joins Cheese Nun in Crusade for Real Food

A box of seed potatoes, for fingerlings, arrived the other day, recalling a few hours I spent years ago harvesting potatoes in a garden in Europe where my daughters did their first sprouting.

When it comes to food and growing things, Michael Pollan has a gift for making you think outside the box. In his new book, “Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation,” he immerses himself in four types of cooking that he links — in theory, fact or informed fancy — to the ancient elements of fire, water, air and earth.

By tracing the roots of barbecue, braising, baking and fermentation while learning the techniques himself, he hopes in part to share the joys and whys of cooking. Ultimately he seeks to transform the heedless eating habits of a nation of consumers who think a square meal comes in a take-away carton.
This is familiar Pollan territory: hands-on, heart-felt and with more than a touch of homily. In “The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals” (2006), he writes, “The way we eat represents our most profound engagement with the natural world.” In “The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World” (2001) he finds startling connections between the human and vegetable.
Wood Fire
With his Dantesque opening in “Cooked” (“At a certain point in the late middle of my life”), Pollan enters the inferno of “whole-hog barbecue over a wood fire.” His guru is pit master Ed Mitchell, who beat Bobby Flay on the Food Network.
Pollan’s backstory here includes the inevitable Prometheus and a recent addition to evolutionary theory known as “the cooking hypothesis”: By applying fire to meat, our forebears found a source of protein and energy more efficient than raw flesh and vegetables and so made the big leap past our emberless cousins.
With water and braising, we move further along the culinary timeline. Pollan doesn’t mince words as he learns about the mirepoix, the soffritto, the tarka and other finely chopped braising bases of different countries. For those who fret over how time-consuming kitchen work can be, he notes that these meals usually provide tasty time-saving leftovers.
Air brings us to bread and a baking guru who schedules his 250 artisanal loaves a day around his surfing needs. Pollan also visits an industrial bakery that shoots out 155,000 a day, the perfect foil for a screed on what is lost beneath the grindstone, namely all the grain’s good stuff: “People who eat lots of whole-grain foods significantly reduce their risk of all chronic diseases.”

see more     http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-04-25/michael-pollan-joins-cheese-nun-in-crusade-for-real-food.html

In my Belly

roast chicken, asparagus wrapped in prosciutto, mashed sweet potato (garnet yam)

roast chicken recipe

roast chicken recipe

for last night’s meal I utilized leftover rosemary/lemon chicken
I wrapped trimmed asparagus in prosciutto which I placed on a sheet pan , drizzled with olive oil and roasted at 350 for 20 minutes,
chicken was warming at the same time.
the sweet potatoes were roasted in foil and then scooped and mashed together with olive oil, butter, s&p, a little brown sugar and a pinch of Chinese five spice.

In my Belly

sliders!!

sliders

sliders

Makes 12 sliders

for the patties:

2 lbs grassfed ground beef, 1 tbs bread crumbs, 1 tsp worchestershire, 1 egg, 1 tbs french onion soup mix, s&p.

12 slider size buns, toasted

sharp cheddar cheap crap ketchup, relish(dill not sweet), ballpark mustard, slice of onion, tomatoes.

bagged spinach salad (yeah it’s a cheat, but it’s a school night…homework, practices, etc)